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ERIC Number: ED196132
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Oct
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The High School Principal's Impact on Classroom Learning Activities: Research Report.
Erlandson, David A.
CCBC Notebook, v10 n1 p3-10 Oct 1980
The high school principal's impact on classroom learning activities is examined in this research report. The study, conducted in four Houston high schools, applied the model described in "CCBC Notebook," February 1980. This report offers a portion of the overall research, providing a summary of the patterns identified. The first segment of the report consists of data collection procedures for the three measured groups: students, teachers, and principals. Two instruments were used, the Class Activities Questionnaire (CAQ) and the Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire (OCDQ), in conjunction with interviews and on-site observations. The second segment lists the findings and analyses. Observations and interviews indicate that the four principals were not equal in their understanding of instruction and, thus, were not equally clear on intentions for instruction. Table 1 compares actual cognitive activity with the teacher's ideal of cognitive activity on seven cognitive levels. Table 2 compares teacher and principal behavior on four dimensions of organizational climate. Three figures provide correlational interaction between levels of instruction and organizational climate dimensions, suggesting that teachers operate according to their unique perception of the school which may differ greatly from the perception of other teachers within the school. Synthesis reveals that data obtained through interviews and observations were remarkably synchronous with the CAQ and OCDQ data. (JK)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: CFK, Ltd., Denver, CO.
Identifiers: Class Activities Questionnaire; Organizational Climate Description Questionnaire
Note: Figures may be marginally legible.