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ERIC Number: ED195819
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980
Pages: 796
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Oversight Hearings on American Secondary Education. Hearings Before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session (Washington, D.C., January 23-24, February 5-7, 1980).
Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.
This is a report of oversight hearings held in Washington, D.C., on January 23 and 24 and February 5, 6, and 7, 1980, to provide the House of Representatives Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee of Education and Labor, with a general picture of the current state of American secondary education. The focus of the first two hearings is an overview of secondary education. The February hearings address crucial problems in secondary education and schools that have successfully dealt with the common problems. Aspects of secondary education discussed include student achievement, curriculum, school discipline, teacher concerns, how secondary schools can be effective, and how schools can prepare for the future. Testimony includes statements and prepared statements, letters, supplemental material, etc., from thirty individuals representing the National Institute of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National Education Association, Council for Basic Education, National Training Laboratories, National Association of Secondary School Principals, and various high schools, school districts, colleges, and universities. (YLB)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.
Identifiers: Stress (Biological)
Note: Not available in paper copy due to small print.