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ERIC Number: ED195657
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 236
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of the Television Series "Feeling Free" on Children's Attitudes toward Handicapped People.
Storey, Kim Susan
The impact of the Feeling Free television series in mainstreamed classrooms was examined to determine if, in what ways, and under what ways it promoted children's awareness, understanding, and acceptance of handicapped people. (Feeling Free is addressed to third through fifth graders to enhance their awareness and understanding of disabled classmates and career opportunities for handicapped.) Twelve upper elementary mainstreamed classrooms, eight experimental and four comparison, in the Greater Boston area participated. Five classrooms viewed two shows a week for three weeks; three viewed one show a week for six weeks. Pre- and post-questionnaires were administered to seven experimental and four comparison classrooms. (One experimental classroom was only posttested to assess pretest effects. Pretesting was found to elevate posttest scores.) As measured by the attitude rating scales in the Children's Attitudes Toward Handicapped People Questionnaire, viewing the series increased children's positive attitudes toward handicapped people on four dimensions: (1) capabilities, skills, and potentials of handicapped people; (2) feelings of handicapped people; (3) handicapped people as friends; and (4) general perceptions of handicapped people. This positive attitude change was not, however, apparent on the two descriptive instruments of the questionnaire. (Questionnaire and data are appended.) (YLB)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.
Identifiers: Education Amendements 1974; Feeling Free; Massachusetts (Boston)
Note: Ed. D. Dissertation, Harvard University. Some pages will not reproduce well due to small, light print. For related documents see ED 132 284, ED 138 786, and CE 026 681.