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ERIC Number: ED195462
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Aug
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Class, Family, Education and the Process of Status Attainment: A Comparison of American and British Women College Graduates.
Baker, Therese L.
This study of women college graduates in the United States and Great Britain analyzes the effect of social origins and familial factors on educational attainment. The sample consisted of 1,435 American and 1,805 British females who graduated in 1961 and 1960 respectively. Longitudinal data were drawn from the National Opinion Research Center and a study by Keith Kelsall at Sheffield University. The study examined the womens' life histories at the time of university graduation, their educational attainment, and their marital and fertility characteristics seven years after graduation. Results indicate that the British graduates had achieved higher socioeconomic status attainment than had the Americans. The data reveal that attainment patterns for American and British women are quite different. The class of degree achieved and undergraduate specialization in the natural sciences or mathematics have an important effect on British women, whereas family background characteristics and characteristics of the undergraduate experience are significant for American women. Also, the status of the undergraduate university is not as influential for American women as it is for British women. In addition, British women tend to forego mothering for a career while American women tend to combine the two. Major differences seem to be a result of early selection for academic training in Great Britain which lends a power to the holders that carries over into occupational careers. (Author/KC)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Great Britain; United States
Note: Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (New York, NY, August, 1980).