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ERIC Number: ED194582
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Sep
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Age, Sex, and Repetition Effects with an Abilities Test Battery.
Wing, Hilda
Applied Psychological Measurement, v4 n2 p141-55 Spr 1980
Prior research with the Professional and Career Administrative Examination (PACE), a multiple abilities test battery for federal candidates, demonstrated practice effects (score gains) on alternate forms of the test parts within one administration of the battery. These effects were largest for those abilities including item types constructed according to explicit rules (induction, deduction), next largest for abilities subject to speededness (number), and least for those abilities tapping general information (verbal, judgment). The present study again demonstrated practice effects by ability--over several administrations. About 48,000 candidates, mostly college seniors and graduates, were identified as having taken the PACE two to five times between 1974 and 1977. The most important contribution to score gains was the number of prior testings. The largest gains were from the first to the second testing. The total test score gain for repetition (0.3 standard deviation) was greater than that predicted from practice effects alone. The repetition gain for number was less than the practice gain, indicating the ephemeral nature of score gains where speededness is involved. Higher initial scores were earned by those repeating the battery the fewest times; higher final scores were earned by those repeating the most times. Age and sex were related to initial score level but not to score gain; age differences in test scores were greatest for those test parts showing the largest effects of practice or repetition. (Author/CP)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Office of Personnel Management, Washington, DC.
Identifiers: Professional and Administrative Career Exam; Repetition Effects
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (88th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, September 1-5, 1980).