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ERIC Number: ED194397
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Sep-1
Pages: 39
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
MACOS: Its Empirical Effects Versus Its Critics.
Cole, Henry P.; Lacefield, Warren E.
Results of a study of a fifth grade social studies curriculum "Man: A Course of Study" (MACOS) are reported. MACOS is a process oriented curriculum which emphasizes the development of highly generalizable thinking and feeling skills. The sample consisted of 242 classrooms randomly selected across the United States. MACOS was compared with another process curriculum "House of Ancient Greece" (HOAG) and with conventional social studies curricula. Teachers were measured according to their value positions with respect to traditional or process-oriented approaches, attitudes concerning human relations, functional approach to pupil control in the classroom, and knowledge and application of process education methodology. Student measurements included involvement in process education learning patterns, activities, and roles; degree of expressional fluency; and degree of enthusiasm and positive regard for social studies. Results indicate that students in MACOS classrooms adopt more active and self-directed learning roles, exhibit more positive attitudes about social studies, and are more fluent and enthusiastic about social studies than children in conventional classrooms. Teachers in MACOS classrooms adopt more facilitative roles which support inquiry behavior and encourage greater intrinsic motivation on the part of students. The conclusion is that MACOS and HOAG, which also tested out favorably, can do much to show teachers, pupils, parents, and communities how to carry out quality instruction. (Author/KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Dept. of Educational Psychology.
Identifiers: Man A Course of Study
Note: Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (Montreal, Quebec, Canada, September 1, 1980). Sponsored by the University of Kentucky's Research Foundation.