NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED192834
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
MisSIS Results of Student Education Intent Survey [and] Supplement to MisSIS Results of Student Education Intent Survey. Institutional Research Reports 79/80-2 [and] 79/80-2A.
Mississippi Gulf Coast Junior Coll., Perkinston.
A survey of the academic, vocational, and technical students enrolled at Mississippi Gulf Coast Junior College (MGCJC) during Fall 1979 was conducted as a contribution to the Educational Intent component of Mississippi's state-wide student information system. The survey instrument, administered during registration, solicited information concerning the students' current employment and overall educational goals. Major findings, based on 5,030 responses, indicate that 44% of the vocational/technical students and 62.4% of the academic students were currently employed; 21.8% of the respondents were working over 40 hours per week; and 41.3% indicated that they had work experience in their field of study. Responses concerning educational goals reveal that 8.8% of the students were enrolled for personal enrichment, 11.6% were preparing for university transfer, and 56% were enrolled for job preparation and/or improvement. Approximately 44% of the students indicated that their educational goals could be met through participation in selected programs, and 41.1% intended to obtain an associate degree. While 63.9% of the respondents said they would re-enroll in the Spring semester, 5% indicated that they would re-enroll at a later date, and 12.2% were undecided. The survey report summarizes findings by educational program and compares results with statewide figures. (JP)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Mississippi Gulf Coast Junior Coll., Perkinston.
Identifiers: Mississippi; Mississippi Student Information System