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ERIC Number: ED191868
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Apr
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Cultural Variation in the Meaning of Achievement.
Fyans, Leslie J., Jr.; And Others
The data presented shows a variation between cultures in the meaning of achievement. The purpose of the study reported was to examine data contained in the Atlas of Subjective Meaning, not only to illustrate variations in the meaning of achievement across cultures, but also to discover continuities that might underly such variations and differentiate the general from the specific in a particular culture. Multivariate regression techniques were used to estimate generalizability of patterns. Concepts selected to be achievement related words (100) were classified into 3 categories: perceived causal role of self; style of achievement behavior; and ultimate goals. These concepts were derived from 30 different language communities, from which subjects were 15-18 year old males enrolled in secondary schools. Findings suggest the possibility of a pancultural meaning of achievement, involving cooperation not competition. The distinction between power and achievement is not prevalent; the importance of work, knowledge, and freedom are emphasized. Freedom, initiation and effort emerge as associated conditions. It is generalized that achievement is associated with an open system where success, progress, and power depend on work, knowledge, cooperation, and courage. (Author/GK)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Distance from Origins Index
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (64th, Boston, MA, April 7-11, 1980).