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ERIC Number: ED191634
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Aug
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Effects of Nonmetro/Metro Origin, Jobs, and Values on Migration Behavior.
Christenson, James A.; And Others
Focusing on migrant decision making processes in the selection of nonmetropolitan or metropolitan destinations, the main and interactive effects of Kentucky migration behavior were examined in terms of community size preference, economic condition, and value adherence. Data were gathered in a 1979 mail survey of registered voters in Kentucky which yielded 11,015 respondents for a response rate of 69.1%. Data were examined using log-linear analysis, bivariate cross tabulations, and analysis of covariance; and the results indicated that place of origin and value adherence had a significant effect on destination, while moves related to employment had only a slight effect on destination. Results also indicated: migrants tended to move to communities similar in size to those left behind; migrants moving for employment reasons tended to make inter metro or inter nonmetro area moves; and migrants moving for nonemployment reasons were more likely to move according to adherence to Gemeinschaft (patriotism, humanitariansim and salvation) or Gesellschaft (personal freedom, individualism, and leisure) value orientations. Therefore, value adherence was seen as the key to the metro/nonmetro switch, and an understanding of value orientations was seen as essential for understanding population redistribution in contemporary American society. (AN)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Agricultural Experiment Station.
Identifiers: Gemeinschaft Gesellschaft Value Scale; Kentucky; Nonmetropolitan Areas; Place of Destination
Note: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Rural Sociological Society (Ithaca, NY, August 19-23, 1980).