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ERIC Number: ED191413
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Sep-1
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Ph.D. Debacle: Job Search Skills--The Path Not Taken?
Cook, Gordon
The difficult job market for PhD's during the current period of retrenchment on campuses and the need for job search skills for the jobs in the nonacademic sector are addressed. It is suggested that colleges and universities should adapt a version of the Deeper Investigation of Growth (DIG) techniques pioneered by Richard Gummere at Columbia University to aid in the placement of PhD's. The training consists of two parts: the analysis of transferable skills necessary to write a functional, skills-oriented resume, and instruction in indirect job searching. In searching back over the experiences gained, the job searcher will find that certain skills stand out, and these skills will help identify values and the appropriate career direction to be pursued. The functional resume is composed of an objective, a brief summary of qualifications necessary for the objective, and a summary of related experiences in graduate work or elsewhere. Educational background and work experience information are listed at the very end. The purpose of indirect job searching is to insert oneself into the network through which unadvertised positions are filled. The applicant asks friends and contacts for the names of people working in positions of importance to whom they can seek advice about the opportunities in their field, the nature of the work, and further contacts that may be helpful. Reference is made to the advice given by the popular guide for job searchers entitled "What Color Is Your Parachute?" (SW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Resumes
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association (New York, NY, September 1, 1978)