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ERIC Number: ED190321
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Jul
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Questions and Answers on Treaty Rights.
National Coalition to Support Indian Treaties, Seattle, WA.; Point No Point Treaty Council, Kingston, WA.
Between 1779 and 1864 the United States signed over 400 legal and binding agreements with Indian governments. Treaties signed between 1779 and 1810 sought Indian alliances against England, France, and Spain (all of whom also signed treaties with the Indians at one time or another). Treaties signed from 1817 to 1846 were treaties of removal, and those of 1846-1864 were reservation treaties. In the treaties, upheld as legal by the U.S. Constitution and courts, the U.S. government promised the Indians health care, education, some monies, and protection from attack on their lands and rights, yet these promises have not often been kept. As tribal strength has increased so has the Indian conviction that to thrive as a people they must retain the land base guaranteed to them and must control its use. They must have authority to levy taxes on reservation lands to obtain the money every government needs to provide services. Strong and economically independent tribal organizations can provide adequate economic opportunities and social services for their people. These and other topics related to Indian treaty rights are explored in a series of 14 questions and answers. (SB)
Publication Type: Historical Materials; Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Coalition to Support Indian Treaties, Seattle, WA.; Point No Point Treaty Council, Kingston, WA.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: For a related document, see ED 173 020.