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ERIC Number: ED190264
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Sep
Pages: 45
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Model for Analyzing the Development of Early Communication Skills, According to Levels of Cognitive Organization.
Seibert, Jeffrey M.
This paper presents a neo-Piagetian model for examining the development of early communication and language skills; discusses its origins in the current developmental literature, and provides a brief overview of a preliminary version of 12 scales developed for assessing communicative development based on the model. The model attempts to provide a comprehensive framework for examining the emergence of communicative competencies in the first 24 to 30 months of life in the context of Kurt Fischer's model of levels of cognitive organization. Through conceptual task analysis communication skills are broken down into several related but distinguishable aspects of interaction with persons that each develop through a common sequence of increasingly more complex, hierarchically arranged levels of organization. A longitudinal research study, currently underway, is designed to evaluate some predictions of the model and is being conducted in the context of an early intervention program for variously developmentally handicapped and at-risk children under 3 years of age. The ultimate objective is to use the model to guide the development of the communication assessment which will, in turn, provide a framework for the construction of a comprehensive social/communicative curriculum for early intervention. (Author/SS)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Bureau of Education for the Handicapped (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Mailman Center for Child Development, Miami, FL.
Identifiers: Piagetian Theory
Note: An earlier version of this paper was presented at the Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development (4th, Boston, MA, September 1979).