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ERIC Number: ED189808
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Apr
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Validity and Reliability of a Learning Style Inventory for Postsecondary Deaf Individuals.
Dowaliby, Fred J.; And Others
Two studies were made of the validity and reliability of a Learning Style Inventory (LSI) for postsecondary deaf individuals. The study's a priori definition of learning style was multidimensional and included aspects of field dependence/independence and perceived locus of Nineteen students were administered the LSI and immediately interviewed on an item-by-item basis. Two validation studies were then performed of the 36-item LSI. In study 1, 100 students were given the LSI and GEFT in a randomly counterbalanced sequence. Item and factor analyses were performed on the resulting data. The findings showed the LSI psychometric properties to be disappointing. A second validation study was carried out to test the hypotheses that the results of the first study were because (1) the dichotomous format of the original LSI limited the variance within each item; and (2) the subjects used were not appropriately experienced. In the second study using 204 students, the 36 LSI items were converted to 72 Likert items with 5 response alternatives. The validation criterion used was the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes (SSHA) Form H. Results of the second study showed that 11 of 16 correlations between the LSI and SSHA subscales was significantly correlated with the GPA. The overriding finding of the study was the implication that paper and pencil self-report techniques for the assessment of personality variables has use with deaf individuals. (DLS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Learning Style Inventory; Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Boston, MA, April, 1980).