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ERIC Number: ED189633
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Two Studies of Composition and Literature Objectives for Gifted and Academically Talented Pupils.
Apple, N. C.; Tierney, P. O.
A study of the goals of an accelerated composition and literature curriculum was subdivided into a "concurrence" strand designed to determine the agreement on course objectives by students, parents, and teachers, and an "attainment" strand to determine the extent to which students attained existing objectives. The study involved 269 tenth and eleventh grade students enrolled in an accelerated English program and 89 parents and teachers. After a pilot study, five course goals were defined for composition (composing/organizing, expository writing, mechanical skills, expressive/imaginative writing, and vocabulary development) and five for literature (literature as it reflects society, analysis of the author's craft, affective appreciation, evaluation, and personal relevance). A free-response instrument required participants to list important course objectives that were later tabulated and categorized under the ten goals. To measure their attainment, students took standardized vocabulary and reading comprehension tests and wrote expository themes. In addition, the themes of a sample of seven gifted pupils were examined for syntactical maturity. Responses showed significant agreement among the groups surveyed on course goals and satisfactory levels of student achievement. The mean scores of the seven gifted students showed a high level of attainment. The findings suggest that parents are a rich source of information and support in formulating or revising programs and that teachers were more interested in developing composition skills than in the literature program. (AEA)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Research prepared at the University of Pittsburgh.