NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED188957
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Infusing Law-Related and Humanities Content and Skills into the Elementary Language Arts Curriculum. Revised Edition.
Branson, Margaret Stimmann
This publication responds to a paper by Judith Stecher which strongly urges that a law related/humanities curriculum be included at the elementary school level. Currently most elementary teachers are concentrating their efforts on just two skills--reading and computing. A recent study of elementary schools in the northern counties of California, for example, reveals that 70% of all class time now is devoted to reading and arithmetic. Very little, if any time, is alloted to social studies and the humanities. Research shows, however, that attempts to teach skills in isolation are doomed to failure. Skills are interrelated. To be taught successfully, they must be related to the process of problem solving, conflict resolution, and valuing. Reading, writing, and computing are not subjects which have content or concepts of their own. In order to teach these skills, teachers should use the ideas and concepts from the social sciences, law, music, art, and philosophy. These subjects are now being neglected in the elementary school. The inclusion of a law related/humanities curriculum in the primary school is critical because it serves children at their "prime time" of learning. Given the desirability of infusing law related, humanities centered content into grades K-6, there are several means of persuasion or courses of action open to concerned citizens: l) inform the public; 2) conduct more staff development and in-service training; and 3) make suitable materials available to teachers. (Author/RM)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Revised and condensed version of a response paper prepared for Symposium on Law and the Humanities, The American Bar Association, Youth Education for Citizenship Committee, July 1978.