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ERIC Number: ED187765
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Apr
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Study of the Relationship between Long-Term Memory and Formal Cognitive Development for Eighth-Grade Students: A Confirmation of Piagetian Theory.
Maher, Carolyn Alexander; O'Brien, John J.
Piaget's theory that distinct stages in the organization of memory correspond to successive stages in cognitive development was tested using 150 eighth graders. Cognitive levels were assessed with Inhelder and Piaget's balance beam task, initially, and again at seven months. Mnemonic levels were assessed with Piaget and Inhelder's memory of an arrangement task, both initially and again at six months. The data strongly supported the Piagetian theory linking long-term memory to cognitive development. Immediate recall memory was independent of the initial cognitive assessment, while six-month correct recall, reconstruction, and recognition memory were highly correlated with the seven-month cognitive assessment. Students who were assessed initially as nonformal, but who became formal within the seven-month interval had the same chance of correct recall, reconstruction, and recognition as those initially assessed to be formal. A seven-month formal congitive assessment was generally characteristic of students with correct six-month recall, while the incorrect recognition and incorrect recall/correct recognition groups did not significantly differ with respect to the percent of formal subjects. The results also supported the view that as a child's intelligence develops, changes occur in the way events are remembered. (Author/GDC)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Piagetian Tests; Piagetian Theory
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (64th, Boston, MA, April 7-11, 1980).