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ERIC Number: ED186173
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Oct-9
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Cultural Democracy and the Multicultural Personality: Effective Leadership for a Diverse Society.
Ramirez, Manuel, III
A person with a synthesized multicultural identity is one that holds positive attitudes toward Chicano and Anglo cultures, functions competently in both cultures, feels accepted by members of both cultures, and possesses a transcendent philosophy of life and world view. Although societal institutions have historically stressed assimilation to the mainstream American middle class, a different philosophy has begun to emerge. Cultural pluralism, or "cultural democracy", permits the individual to retain identification with his own culture as he identifies with other cultures in American society. Individuals comfortable with a number of cultures are particularly needed as leaders today. Research with bicultural Mexican Americans in California and Texas has shown such people to possess flexibility in learning styles, human relational styles and incentive-motivational styles. A study on the leadership behaviors exhibited by monocultural and multicultural college students in mixed ethnic groups under conditions of conflict indicated leaders with high multicultural experience to be particularly effective. Such individuals were less autocratic and more democratic than their low multicultural experience counterparts. They also were more accurate in reporting what had actually transpired in their groups and accepted more readily the responsibility for their group's action. This document also describes the development of the Flexibility, Unity and Expansion Model of Acculturation and an instrument for assessing multiculturalism in Mexican Americans. (DS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research; Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Chicanos
Note: An inaugural lecture given at Oakes College (Santa Cruz, CA, October 9, 1979). Best copy available.