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ERIC Number: ED184561
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Jun
Pages: 112
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Computer Science and Technology: Measurement of Interative Computing: Methodology and Application.
Cotton, Ira W.
This dissertation reports the development and application of a new methodology for the measurement and evaluation of interactive computing, applied to either the users of an interactive computing system or to the system itself, including the service computer and any communications network through which the service is delivered. The focus is on the performance of the user and the system in individual interaction sessions with the basic data of interest being the number and rate of characters sent by user and system, and latencies or delays prior to and during transmission by either party. Analysis of the data consists of grouping according to two independent criteria: maximum operating line speed of the terminal and type of application. The data are grouped according to these criteria and cumulative frequency distributions are computed for each of 14 parameters of the model. Non-parametric tests are used to determine the significance of differences in the distributions of different sets of data. The methodology itself is the major contribution of the study, providing a quantitative way to investigate a variety of phenomena associated with interactive computing. The most interesting specific finding from the data collected is the increase in output data length as the terminal speed increases. (Author/RAO)
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402 (Stock No. 003-003-02081-8, $4.00)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC. Inst. for Computer Sciences and Technology.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Ph.D. Dissertation, George Washington University.