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ERIC Number: ED184406
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Apr
Pages: 47
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Work Experience of American College Professors: Some Data and an Argument.
Ladd, Everett Carll, Jr.
Survey data on professional activities, concerns, and commitments of the professoriat show that as a group faculty spend only a modest amount of time on scholarship and much more on teaching, by preference. This is especially true of older faculty and those in two-year colleges. In general this appears to fit with faculty responsibilities. Their dissatisfactions with the profession are not only economic but also have to do with lowering of academic standards. Despite this, the faculty "model" remains one of research and scholarship, positing what faculty should be doing, which is seriously out of touch with what they actually do and want to do. It is not necessarily true that good teaching requires involvement in scholarly research. It is concluded that it is difficult to serve both purposes well. The reward structures for research are sturdy; those for good teaching need to be rebuilt. Tables are included on publication history of American academics (total, by type of school, and by age), hours spent per week on professional activities, academic levels of students taught, relative claims of teaching and research, teaching and research commitments, professional self-perceptions, and criticisms directed at higher education. (MSE)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Faculty Publishing
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Association for Higher Education (Washington, DC, April 16-19, 1979).