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ERIC Number: ED183125
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-May-22
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Distribution of Types and Packages of Student Aid Among Freshmen.
American Council on Education, Washington, DC. Policy Analysis Service.
Presented are extensive data tables showing the distribution of types and packages of student financial aid in the United States, according to family income, tuition level, and institutional control. Data are drawn from the data bank of the Cooperative Institutional Research Program. Federal need-based aid is emphasized. Some narration is provided, and federal policy implications are discussed. It is noted that almost half of all freshmen received some form of aid from some source; a little less than half these students had family incomes under $12,500. However, there were still substantial numbers of low-income students who did not receive aid. Self-help programs were found to be clearly useful in aiding higher-income students. Basic Educational Opportunity Grants (BEOG) were the only awards received by 57 percent of the survey respondents. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants were almost always part of a larger package. About half those receiving state or institutional grants also received some federal aid. The College Work-Study Program was the self-help program with the largest participation by low-income students, and federal self-help was often the only form of federal assistance received. Nearly two-thirds of the aided students received only a single award of any kind. It is concluded that (1) the BEOG formula and Uniform Methodology should be evaluated in terms of the characteristics of low-income students not now eligible; (2) appropriations for self-help programs should be made with the knowledge that it is the only form available to some; and (3) how BEOG-only students finance their education should be closely examined. (MSE)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Lilly Endowment, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.
Authoring Institution: American Council on Education, Washington, DC. Policy Analysis Service.
Identifiers: Basic Educational Opportunity Grants; Cooperative Institutional Research Program