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ERIC Number: ED182877
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Aug
Pages: 386
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Mainstreaming Secondary Level Deaf Students in Occupational Education Programs.
Munson, Harold L.; Miller, John K.
The 3 year study investigated four New York programs in which junior and senior high school students enrolled in schools for the deaf were mainstreamed into occupational education courses at neighboring education centers. Data were collected on philosophical views toward career education, information and decision making functions, individual educational planning and program articulation, establishment and maintenance of an effective learning environment, knowledge and attitudes toward deafness in the occupational setting, the social milieux, program graduates, and parental and student reaction. Among findings were the following: career guidance was largely nonexistent, parents relied heavily on the judgment of school personnel for program planning recommendations, written tests were seen as the appropriate assessment tool for evaluating students' content or substantive knowledge, the course options of deaf students were limited to reasonably receptive situations, classroom social climate was generally favorable toward mainstreamed students (ostensibly to protect them from negative bias), and a substantial number of student withdrawals reported difficulties with classroom instruction and evaluation processes. Suggestions were made regarding mainstreaming, vocational learning-maturaton, the cognition of work, social learning-maturation, developing individualized educational programs, gearing up staff, serving mainstreamed students, collaborating with parents, and providing transition from school to work. (SBH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Rochester Univ., NY. Graduate School of Education and Human Development.
Identifiers: New York