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ERIC Number: ED182246
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Dec
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Young Women's Preferences for Market Work: Responses to Marital Events. Revised.
Spitze, Glenna D.; Waite, Linda J.
The research paper examines how women's relative preferences for market work and home work are effected by three transitions: first marriage, first birth, and marital dissolution. The hypothesis was that all three events should affect market work preference by changing levels of available resources, such as time and money, and by changing the level of personal fulfillment derived from family life. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women, a causal model was developed measuring these effects in relation to several background and situational variables. Probit analysis indicated that first marriage decreases market work preferences through age 24 but not beyond that age, perhaps because concomitant changes in resources are less unexpected after than before that age. Marital dissolution tended to increase preference for market work at ages 19 through 29, probably by exposing women to financial insecurity. A first birth had no immediate impact, but was followed one to two years later by striking upward revisions in marriage and childbearing and increased probability of divorce led to increases in the level of preference for market work. Two recommendations are made: additional research including more detailed information on women's preferences and expectations before and after these events, and that the family-work conflict issues be raised in high school. (Author/CK)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (Boston, MA, August 27-31, 1979)