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ERIC Number: ED181960
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1980-Jan
Pages: 36
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Applications, Acceptances and Registrations, Fall 1975-Fall 1979.
Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.
Patterns in student progression from application to acceptance and registration were analyzed for the fall semesters from 1975 to 1979 at six Hawaii community colleges. The data, compiled from the Coordinated Admissions Program Information System and from the Student Information System, indicate, with regard to applications, that: (1) a total of 12,487 applications were processed in 1979; of these, 8,420 were from students applying as first-time college students and 4,067 from transfer students; (2) this total did not differ greatly from previous semesters; (3) there were generally more female than male applicants; and (4) there were more applicants for vocational programs among new students and more for liberal arts programs among transfer students; in early years, there had been more liberal arts applicants in both groups. With regard to acceptances, the study revealed that 96% of the applicants were accepted in fall 1979--an increase over fall 1978. Acceptance rates ranged from 92% to 98% at the various campuses, and did not differ greatly by sex or by broad program areas. In previous years, acceptance rates for females and liberal arts applicants were higher. The data also reveal that the registration rates of those applicants that were accepted have declined steadily, from 75% in fall 1975 to 67% in fall 1979 for new students; and from 67% to 61% for transfer students. Tables provide data for the system as a whole and for each campus. (Author/AYC)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.
Identifiers: Hawaii