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ERIC Number: ED180305
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-May
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
After the Revolution Comes the Educational Testing Service: Notes on Higher Education in China 1978.
Gamson, Zelda F.
Societal conditions and higher education in China are discussed based on a recent trip to the People's Republic of China, conversations with representatives from the Ministry of Education, and visits to Chungshan University in Kwangchow (Canton), Futan University in Shanghai, the University of Szechwan in Chengtu, and Chiaotung (Communications) University in Sian. Recent changes in the educational system in China can be understood in relation to the effects of industrialization. Societies in the process of industrializing depend on people who can understand and operate the new technologies brought be economic development. The educational system serves the economic system by producing people who can work in the occupations and organizations created by industrialization. Two different sectors emerge in the educational system: a mass sector and an elite sector. In the mass sector are the primary and secondary schools that train people in the basic skills needed to work with machines and in complex organizations. In the elite sector are those schools that teach people how to innovate and to manage the new system. Entry to the mass sector is available by right, to the elite sector by selection. The Cultural Revolution challenged the elite sector but did not succeed in toppling it. The great achievement was the expansion of the mass sector. The emphasis on rapid economic development among the moderates in control of China today has revived the elite sector, and the implications of this for reducing inequalities are momentous. (Author/SW)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: China; Cultural Revolution
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (1979)