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ERIC Number: ED179286
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Sep
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Equilibration and Sensory Overload in the Pre-School Child: Some Effects of Children's Television Programming.
Miller, Thomas W.
This paper reports an attempt to research sensory overstimulation in a variety of children's television programs by rating the level of visual sensory stimulation, auditory sensory stimulation, verbal response patterns and nonverbal response patterns in 45 television programs designed for pre-school children. The Television Rating Inventory (TVRI) was designed to objectively assess these four dimensions on a 7-point Likert-type scale ranging from helpful to harmful. Programs were assessed by four independent raters. A comparison was made among programs of the following types: (1) cartoon-animal characters (Pink Panther), (2) cartoon-individual characters (Fat Albert), (3) cartoon-group or family characters (Addams Family), (4) human live-action (The Three Stooges), and (5) educational programs (Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood). Results suggest that significant mean differences exist between the types of programming offered through educational children's programs and cartoon features, with the education programs being rated as more helpful than harmful to the pre-school child. Assessment and brief suggest that significant mean differences exist between the types of programming offered through educational children's programs and cartoon features, with the eudcation programs being rated as more helpful than harmful to the pre-school child. Assessment and brief discussion include issues and implications related to adversary roles, sexual stereotyping, aggressive behavior, identification and role models, and likely outcomes in observed childrens' behavior as a result of television viewing. (Author/SS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Sensory Overload
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (87th, New York, NY, September 1-5, 1979)