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ERIC Number: ED178446
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Nov-20
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The NSF Studies of Status of Pre-Collegiate Education: Implications for Social Studies Professors and Curriculum Developers.
Shaver, James P.
The necessity for social studies professors and curriculum developers to recognize the reality of teacher attitudes and classroom situations is discussed. The author contends that teachers are not very reflective about what they teach and about the effect of their teaching on students. This lack of introspection can be traced to teacher education programs. Part of the problem is that teachers are trained to be teachers prior to their gaining experience as teachers. A suggestion is to spend less time in preservice education by preparing would-be teachers for the minimal requirements of lesson planning and classroom management. The emphasis on teaching techniques, curriculum methods, and philosophy would be reserved for inservice teachers. Other conflicts between (1) social studies teachers and (2) professors and curriculum developers are a result of the focus of both groups. Social studies professors and developers tend to focus on conceptual structures which will excite, interest, and develop independent thinking. Teachers focus on how to control and manage students. Also, conflict results from the democratic mandate for both stability and progress. Social studies teachers, members of a community in which values of conformity dominate, gravitate toward stability, while university professors advocate teaching controversial issues. It is important to pay attention to the social system in which the teacher operates and the reality of the setting in which teaching occurs. (Author/KC)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the National Council for the Social Studies (Portland, OR, November 20, 1979); For a related document, see SO 012 084