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ERIC Number: ED177960
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Jul-31
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The States Face Issues of Quality in Higher Education.
Millett, John D.
Three issues of quality in higher education are addressed: defining quality in public higher education, obstacles to the accomplishment of quality, and how to sell the need for quality in public higher education to the government and others. It is suggested that varied standards of student and faculty performance are needed among types of institutions and among programs. Different missions of universities and programs necessarily involve different standards of qualitative evaluation. It is proposed that there is a quantitative dimension to quality. In addition to quantitative standards of institutional size, faculty size, enrollment size, and degree size, institutions need to assess qualifications of the faculty, entering test scores of incoming students, average faculty compensation, the student-faculty ratio, and other parameters. Ideally, the essential indices of quality for any college or university ought not to be inputs but outputs, the outcomes of the educational process, and the outcomes should tell the student learning accomplished, the research performed, the creative expression realized, the public service undertaken, and other values. Two obstacles to achieving quality are (1) a legislative and perhaps a public perception that an avowal of quality is self-serving and (2) the perception among minority groups and especially of blacks that an avowal of quality is simply a new form of racial or ethnic discrimination. To sell the need for quality, it is important to define and make explicit the individual competencies we wish to achieve through higher education. (SW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Speech presented to the invitational seminar of the Ohio Statewide Coordinating and Governing Boards (July 31, 1979)