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ERIC Number: ED176891
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Mar
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Class Inclusion Then Role-Taking, a Sequence?
Gash, Hugh
This training study investigated the relation between class inclusion and role-taking in elementary school children. The objectives were: (1) to establish the asynchrony between class inclusion and role-taking on an Irish sample and a French sample of preoperational children, and (2) to investigate whether this asynchrony is merely a function of the difficulty of the measures used or whether a developmental sequence is entailed by the sequence. Subjects were 72 Irish 5- and 7-year-old children and 72 French 6- and 7-year-old children. Six tasks were used to measure class inclusion. Three cartoons, each of which was followed by two role-taking questions, were used to measure role-taking ability. Following pretesting, subjects were assigned to either a control group or one of two training groups, class-inclusion or role-taking training. Training procedures emphasized verbal inducement of conflict. Results indicated the following: First, a developmental asynchrony was confirmed in which class inclusion emerged prior to role-taking. Second, training in class inclusion and in role-taking significantly increased the skill trained as indicated on posttest scores. Third, training in role-taking, which was successful only with 7-year-olds, significantly increased class inclusion scores at this age level; successful training in class inclusion, however, did not increase role-taking significantly. It is concluded that the form of role-taking measured includes the mental operations necessary for class inclusion. (Author/SS)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Center of Scientific Research, Paris (France).; National Science Council, Dublin (Ireland).
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Class Inclusion; France; Ireland
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (San Francisco, California, March 15-18, 1979)