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ERIC Number: ED176885
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Sep
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Reemphasizing the Social in Social Cognition.
Paget, Katherine Frome
Research in developmental social cognition should detail commonalities between self and other as well as the self-other differentiation process. A method which indexed developmental changes in the understanding of both intersubjective rules of interpersonal behavior and subjective individual perspectives was devised to research questions concerning (1) the relation between causal inferences and formal operational thinking skills or context dependency, and (2) the relationship between perspective taking-ability and person perception. Boys and girls clearly characterizied by either concrete operational transitional, and fully formal operational skills were formed into sex balanced groups of 20 subjects each. Cognitive ability level was assessed and the vocabulary subtest on the WISC or the WAIS was administered. Subjects were then individually presented three fairy-tale segments, with pictorial sequences. The stories chosen included causal chains of events which were available to the subject, but which lent themselves to different interpretations by characters in the stories. Each subject was asked to retell the story as presented to him or her, relate the story first from the perspective of the protagonist and then from that of a late-arriving bystander, and answer questions after each story. Story reconstructions were content analyzed. Among the results, formal operational subjects were more interpretive and psychological in their responses than both their concrete and transitional counterparts. Concrete and transitional subjects did not significantly differ. (Author/RH)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Habermas (J); Person Perception; Symbolic Interaction Theory
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (87th, New York, New York, September 1-5, 1979)