NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED176695
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Jul
Pages: 58
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Job Satisfaction Among College Graduates.
Spaeth, Joe L.; Handler, Lynn P.
Job satisfaction for college graduates is examined in this report that focuses on subjective determinants. It is contended that many objective characteristics, such as education and earnings, have little impact on job satisfaction. Data are taken from the National Opinion Research Center longitudinal survey of college graduates from the class of 1961, which included questions on job satisfaction for 1962 and 1964. Working full-time and being in a job related to one's major were important determinants of 1962 job satisfaction for women. Job satisfaction in 1962 was also an important determinant of women's 1964 job satisfaction. Working for a government agency had only modest negative effects, and earnings had no effects among women. Challenge was the most important determinant of 1964 job satisfaction among women. For 1964 job satisfaction, satisfaction in 1962 was an important determinant for men also. Job-personality match had no effects, but men's ratings of the quality of their undergraduate training in preparing them for their current jobs had modest positive effects. Neither working for a governmental agency nor earnings affected 1964 job satisfaction among men. Ratings of the degree of challenge offered by a job were strong determinants of men's 1964 job satisfaction. Difficulties in researching and measuring job satisfaction are also examined, and the questionnaire items for analysis of job satisfaction are appended. (Author/SF)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Illinois Univ., Urbana. Survey Research Lab.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: The appendix, Questionnaire Items for Analysis of Job Satisfaction, may not reproduce well due to marginal legibility of original