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ERIC Number: ED176131
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Mar
Pages: 67
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Cincinnati: Public Attitudes About Crime; A National Crime Survey Report.
National Criminal Justice Information and Statistics Service (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.
The National Crime Survey found many Cincinnati residents fearful at night, changing or limiting their activities because of this, and holding the impression that crime was on the upswing, both in their neighborhoods and nationally, with increasing chances of their being victimized. Contradictorily, relatively few persons considered crime risk a paramount influence on their behavior, yet nearly two-fifths claimed they had changed or limited their activities in some manner because of crime. Opinions and effects varied across population subgroups. Whites were more prone to express apprehension about visiting beyond their neighborhoods, while blacks were much more likely to fear their own neighborhoods at night and to claim they had limited or changed their activities. Nearly three-fifths of all women felt unsafe when out alone in their neighborhoods at night, compared with only 22% of males. Older persons were more intimidated than younger ones. Victimization strongly increased the perceived probability of further victimization, the fear of visiting beyond the neighborhood at night, and the opinion that the neighborhood was dangerous enough to warrant moving away. Cincinnatians generally were, however, positive about local police performance. (LS)
Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (027-000-00774-1)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD.
Authoring Institution: National Criminal Justice Information and Statistics Service (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.
Identifiers: Ohio (Cincinnati)