NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED176060
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 207
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Research for Women: Sex Stereotyping, Non-Traditional Jobs, and Vocational Training. Final Report.
California State Univ., Sacramento. Inst. for Human Service Management.
To determine the feasibility of developing skills training programs for women interested in skilled labor employment, a year-long study examined the problems surrounding the influx of women into skilled labor occupations and the elements which define success in gaining employment. The study was conducted in two phases: an exploratory phase and a descriptive phase. The exploratory phase consisted of a literature review and thirty interviews with employers, union officials, women in skilled labor, and directors of community organizations. This resulted in the development of four questionnaires: for employers, male workers in skilled labor, unemployed women, and working women. These groups were split according to specific sectors: public, private, utilities, military, unemployed women, and employers. In phase 2 the questionnaires were administered to 489 men and women within these sectors. Findings included the following: (1) younger male workers seem to be less traditional in their stated attitudes regarding women, (2) non-working women indicated that the most important reasons for desiring non-traditional work are money and the challenge, (3) two-thirds of the employers believe women are capable of learning most skilled labor jobs, and (4) the working women population has received little, is any, vocational training. (Questionnaires and codebooks are appended.) (LRA)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Div. of Vocational Education.
Authoring Institution: California State Univ., Sacramento. Inst. for Human Service Management.
Identifiers: California