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ERIC Number: ED175143
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Oct
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The New Mexico Principalship Study. Part I. Factors Affecting the Principalship Yesterday and Today.
Blood, Ronald E.; Miller, James P., Jr.
The phenomenon of principal "burn out" is the result of many conditions surrounding the principalship. First, as the number of students has risen over the last 40 years, the number of schools has declined. Too, teachers have become better educated and more specialized, making them less ready to accept the opinions and direction of principals. Since the 1930s the curriculum has become more complex, with more special education and categorical programs. Control of the schools has diversified, with power being divided among many central office staff members, the courts, federal and state governments, and the community. Because of this diversification, it is sometimes difficult for the principal to know where to look for direction, and role clarification is badly needed. In recent years, the education profession, once united, has split into distinct groups: teachers (labor), superintendents (management), and school principals (caught in the middle). To create a situation where the principal can reasonably be expected to carry out the responsibilities of the role, these conditions surrounding the principalship must be changed. (Author/JM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Principal Burn Out
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, California, April 8-12, 1979)