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ERIC Number: ED174921
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Aug
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Consumer Satisfaction: Its Role in the Evaluation of Mental Health Services.
Resnick, Harvey
Specific ways were investigated for using evaluative date generated from two consumer satisfaction surveys in two different mental health settings. The first survey, consisting of 225 randomly selected current consumers of mental health services from Rochester Mental Health Center in Rochester, New York, explored global satisfaction, structural features of the facility (e.g., parking, waiting room), general service (e.g., treatment by those other than therapist) and satisfaction with specific program changes. Results pinpointed specific problem areas, led to staff discussions about reasons for using medication with clients, and examined the relationships between staff and clients. Further consumer data based on termination questionnaires and other instruments completed by students of the University of Rochester Counseling Services were collected in the second survey. Results of this survey indicated that: (1) relative to other types of consumer-provider relationships in the general marketplace, the counseling service area is often viewed by students as the only alternative available, and thus students are not necessarily selecting services on the basis of cost or quality; (2) there is often no direct penalty to the provider if the consumer-student leaves treatment, which can easily lead to too little or too low a quality of service; and (3) given the lack of the usual built-in consumer safeguards, the client needs to be involved more directly in the evaluation of services. Comparisons between the two studies revealed that consumer surveys helped to: (1) focus staff concern for neglected areas of consumer experience; (2) create dialogue between staff and administrators for problem identification and solution; (3) provide data for budget and program changes; and (4) provide opportunity for feedback that allowed for personal assessment of service delivery. (Author)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, August, 1978)