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ERIC Number: ED174507
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Apr
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Music and Cognitive Research Where Do Our Questions Come From: Where Do Our Answers Go? DSRE Working Paper No. 2.
Bamberger, Jeanne
The paper discusses the use of music-based experiments to illuminate teachers' understanding of their own and pupils' informal ways of learning. The major objective of the paper is to help teachers understand students' learning processes. Because one central problem in academic research is that of finding the right questions, researchers should begin with the various ways children learn. In experiments, the teacher bases hypotheses on subjective awareness and interventions and then tests her hunches concerning the student's intuitive strategies. This process adds to a teacher's self-knowledge and increases understanding of the child's current knowledge and ways of learning. With this increased understanding, a teacher can help the child integrate his basic cognitive skills with the more formal basic skills used in schools. The success of these experiments is dependent upon the teacher's willingness to take risks and a realization that her own and the student's errors show cognitive work in progress. It is concluded that because music and the arts are non-threatening, they are rich in opportunities for illuminating cognitive research and research in adult learning or teacher development, by being used as a source of mediation between intuitive knowledge and the more formal skills taught in the schools. (CK)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.; Ford Foundation, New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, California, April 8-12, 1979) ; Paper prepared through the Division for Study and Research in Education