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ERIC Number: ED174343
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Mar
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Early Contact and Maternal Perceptions of Infant Temperament.
Campbell, Susan B. Goodman; And Others
Extra post-partum mother-infant contact in the first hour of life does not appear to enhance maternal perceptions of infant temperament at 8 months. Subjects of a study of the effects of mother-infant contact on infant temperament were healthy, white, first-born infants and their mothers. Mothers were randomly assigned to an experimental group in which they received an additional hour of contact with their child or to a control group in which they received regularly scheduled contact. When infants were 8 months old mothers were requested to complete the Carey Temperament Questionnaire. This measure consists of 70 items descriptive of infant behavior in a variety of situations including feeding, response to caretaking, and interest in the environment. Behaviors are rated on 3-point scales to reflect nine temperamental characteristics such as rhythmicity, intensity, threshold, and persistence. At the time of the study, 56 mothers had completed the questionnaire. Infants were 15 extra contact males, 14 extra contact females, 15 regular contact males, and 12 regular contact females. Analysis of the data (2 by 2 ANOVA) showed no main effects for the extra contact group. There were no significant sex by treatment interactions. Female infants were rated higher than males in threshold and intensity. In general, findings indicate that extra contact may have no systematic influence on maternal perceptions of the infant or that self-report instruments may be insensitive to the presumably subtle effects of early contact. (Author/RH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Infant Temperament; Mother Infant Contact
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (San Francisco, California, March 15-18, 1979) ; Best copy available