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ERIC Number: ED174342
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Mar
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Early Contact and Infant-Mother Attachment at One-Year.
Ottaviano, Christine M.; And Others
This paper reports the effects of one hour of extra post-partum contact between mother and infant on the quality of the attachment observed when the infant was one year old. It was hypothesized that infants in the extra contact condition would be classified as securely attached while regular contact infants would be less frequently classified as securely attached. Subjects were 40 mother-infant dyads who were observed in the Ainsworth Strange Situation. All infants in the sample were first born, Caucasian, and middle class. Groups were matched on years of maternal education and age. Each infant's level of cognitive development was assessed. Six undergraduate women alternated in the roles of stranger and observer. Observers gave narrative accounts of the behavior of infants, mothers and strangers. Accounts were tape recorded and transcribed. On the basis of the observer accounts, infants were classified as secure, ambivalent, or avoidant, using Ainsworth's criteria. Additional qualitative features of infant behavior, such as proximity and contact seeking, clinging, and turning away, were assessed. Results do not confirm the initial hypothesis that infants who experienced extra, early post-partum contact with their mothers would be more likely to demonstrate a secure attachment to mother in the Ainsworth Strange Situation at one year of age. Additional early contact with mothers did not influence either qualitative differences or cognitive development of infants. (Author/RH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Ainsworth Strange Situation Test; Bonding (Interpersonal Relations)
Note: Best available copy; Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (San Francisco, California, March 15-18, 1979)