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ERIC Number: ED174300
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Sep
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Social Mobility and Political Orientations of Male and Female Adolescents: An Empirical Examination of the Anticipatory Socialization Concept.
Goodman, Neal R.; Barenblatt, Lloyd
The relationship between male and female adolescents' political orientations and their classes of origin versus their projected classes of destination (related to class mobility) was investigated in 665 high school seniors attending both public and parochial schools. It was predicted that adolescents' projected classes of destination would be more strongly related than their classes of origin to their political orientations, and that this would be true for females as well as males. Each student's class of origin was determined by classifying the highest ranked occupation of either parent according to the Duncan Index of Socio-Economic Status. Projected class of destination was determined by similarly ranking the student's future occupation career choice and by a combined measure of both effort and ability determinants of future college plans. Measurement of political-social attitudes consisted of scales of economic and non-economic liberalism and the authoritarian scale. Results were analyzed for four groups: middle class stable, middle class downwardly mobile, working class stable, and working class upwardly mobile. The results of several analyses generally supported the predictions: Multiple Regression Analysis on the combined measure of political orientation indicated that for both males and females, the variance contributed by their projected class of destination was substantially greater than that contributed by their class of origin. Findings for the separate measures of political orientation indicated some sex differences. Correlations for the two groups of adolescents classified as mobile show that both males' and females' responses to each of the political scales were in the same direction as those of the stable class for which they were presumably destined. (Author/SS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Anticipatory Socialization
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (73rd, San Francisco, California, September 4-8, 1978) ; Best copy available