NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED174184
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Apr
Pages: 39
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Robots or Reinsmen: Job Opportunities and Professional Standing for Collegiate Administrators in the 1980's. ASHE Annual Meeting 1979 Paper.
Scott, Robert A.
Which model provides a more accurate picture of future job responsibilities and professional standing for middle-level administrators in colleges and universities: the robot, or the reinsman who has ability, courage, and control but stays in the background? Competing forces are described in this speech: the institution's desire for stability and the administrator's desire for challenges and the full use of his ability. Role conflicts and role confusion can undermine administrative effectiveness. Given these limitations and the probable failure to develop a new purpose, the form, processes, and practices of higher education will probably not change appreciably in the foreseeable future; but there will be changes in college administration. New clientele will require new services, and new public policies and patterns of attendance may lead us to expect a reduction in some current services. There is a tendency toward bureaucratization and centralization as a survival mechanism. The effects will be continued demands on the senior officers and governing bodies of institutions, and an increasing need for administrative help. Colleges and universities should become the pacemakers in developing new models of mobility and advancement. Organizations should and can be flexible and give as much attention to the talents and interests of gifted staff as to the functions to be carried out. The reinsman, with his authority, reflexes, and independence, is a model for collegiate administrators to follow. (Author/MSE)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: ASHE Annual Meeting 1979
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (Washington, D.C., April 1979)