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ERIC Number: ED174141
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-May
Pages: 33
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Enrollment Management Study: Five Scenarios.
Albers, James R.; Burns, James A.
The effect of enrollment level changes on the long-range future of Western Washington University are investigated. Due to the high rate of Washington state in-migration, declining enrollments are not projected for Western Washington University. The impact of managed enrollment goals was examined to help the university determine the most appropriate enrollment level. Data from a sociopolitical survey of faculty and administration were used to compile five possible scenarios of development for the university. Significant trends that were identified by the survey and used in the development of the models include: rate of technological change; development of new energy sources; percentage of women entering the workforce; Washington state in-migration; frequency of midcareer job changes, competition to attract students, and competition among institutions for financial resources. The models are based on five different enrollment levels: 8,000; 10,000; 12,000; 15,000; and an unregulated level (projected at 11,100). The eight areas of data in each model, based on three-year averages, include: operating budget, student credit hours, full-time equivalent faculty, administrative exempt positions, classified staff positions, dormitory occupancy, library acquisition funds, and facilities. The five models discuss possible program impacts related to enrollment increases or decreases. An estimate of the amount and rate of growth or decline of those programs most likely to be affected by enrollment changes is included. The implications of managed enrollment goals for the admissions process and the quality of education are also discussed. The importance of planning for change and redistribution of resources is emphasized. (SF)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Western Washington Univ., Bellingham. Office of Institutional Research.
Identifiers: Western Washington University