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ERIC Number: ED173518
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Comparative Study of Asian Children and Learning Difficulties.
Okura, K. Patrick
Learning disability has become one of the most serious afflictions of childhood in the United States. Approximately 6 to 15 percent of American children have difficulty in learning how to read. In contrast, educators and other professionals in China and Japan report that dyslexia is rather rare in their countries except in cases where there is a clear neurological disorder. Differences in language structures are cited as one possible explanation. Another explanation offered is that parents in China and Japan provide their children with different preschool experiences from those provided by American parents. Some researchers have challenged these views. However, a number of studies, conducted in China and Japan and in the United States seem to indicate that differences in cognitive ability between Japanese, Chinese and American children do exist. These apparent differences present a question for comparative investigation, but, if the research is to be legitimate, equal respect must be given to the cultural heritages and experiences of the ethnic groups involved. (Author/EB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: China; Japan; United States
Note: Paper presented at the International Conference of Association for Children with Learning Disabilities (San Francisco, California, February 28-March 3, 1979)