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ERIC Number: ED173204
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Internal Politics of Growth and Decline. Part II, Chapter 2.
Hannan, Michael T.; Freeman, John
The document, part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759, describes a model that incorporates organizational politics and environmental dependence into a study of the effects of growth and decline on the number of school personnel. The first section describes the original model which assumes that as the number of students in a district changes, the number of employees should change proportionately and that the process should work the same way in growth and decline. The authors argue that the weakness of this model is that it does not indicate the political process of personnel change during periods of growth and decline. The second section discusses the two-part model. The first part deals with the effect of carrying capacity (the upper limit of the size of population that can be sustained in a particular system) on the number of personnel. Carrying capacity is determined by three variables: exogenous environmental variations (enrollments and finances), internal competitive relations (organizational politics), and history (social, political, and cultural characteristics of the local environment). The second part focuses on the responsiveness or speed of response of administrators to change in their carrying capacity. The third section discusses application of the model to California school districts, using yearly counts of enrollments and the sizes of four personnel categories: teachers, administrators, pupil service employees, and calssified non-professionals. Results indicate that the politics of growth and decline are vastly different. Competitive interactions are stronger in decline, carrying capacities for most personnel components are lower at a given level of enrollment in decline, and organizational systems respond more slowly to changes in decline. (Author/KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Stanford Univ., CA.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: For related documents, see SO 011 759-772