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ERIC Number: ED173022
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Sep
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Report on the Second Year of the Kumtuks Alternative Rehabilitation Program of Templeton Secondary School. Research Report 78-06.
Brenner, Lynne
Kumtuks, established by the Vancouver School Board in 1976, is an alternative educational program for Native Indian adolescents who have the potential to complete Grade 12 but whose recent school histories show poor attendance, deficiencies in basic skills, low motivation, and poor self-concept. The goal of the program is to enable students to complete their education in regular secondary school; curriculum includes basic skills in English and mathematics, Native Indian Studies, science, and adaptive skills necessary for success in the school and urban community. In its second year (September 1977 to June 1978) Kumtuks enrolled 23 students, ages 12 to 16, whose average grade attainment at enrollment was Grade 7. Student progress was evaluated by the following measures: attendance, KeyMath Diagnostic Arithmetic Test, Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests, Canadian Tests of Basic Skills, and self-concept (adapted from How I See Myself Scale); student progress in a special values clarification program and staff evaluations were also considered. Student attendance rate of 96.4% compared favorably with the sponsoring school; 16 of the 23 students gained one or slightly more than one grade level beyond their entry placement; self-concept scores improved, and individual changes occurred in the values clarification program. All but one of the students plan to attend school in September 1978; 12 will return to Kumtuks. (JH)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Vancouver Board of School Trustees (British Columbia).
Identifiers: British Columbia (Vancouver)
Note: Not available in paper copy due to marginal legibility of original document ; Funded in part by the Ministry of Human Resources and by the First Citizens Fund