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ERIC Number: ED173010
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Dec
Pages: 124
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Discovering Folklore Through Community Resources.
Sumpter, Magdalena Benavides, Ed.
The folkways and cultural heritage of the Mexican Americans of South Texas are explored in this volume which is designed to provide the student with the opportunity for cultural enrichment, oral language development, and vocabulary expansion. The first chapter deals with "Creencias" which are common beliefs handed down from generation to generation. One of the 23 beliefs listed is "To make it rain soon, hang a horned toad". The second chapter lists customs and traditions associated with baptisms, debuts (quinceanera), weddings and funerals. Faith healing practices are discussed in the third chapter. Photographs show the procedures to be followed in curing such afflictions as "ojo" and several forms of fright (susto) or indigestion (empacho). Don Pedro Jaramillo, a famous faith healer who lived in South Texas in the late 19th century, is also discussed. The fourth chapter discusses the uses of several medicinal herbs, e.g., ajo, alcanfor, anis, canela, and romero. Chapter five lists a number of historical sites in South Texas. Proverbs and traditional riddles, written in both English and Spanish, are listed in the sixth and seventh chapters. The final chapter includes a number of the most popular tales in the Mexican American culture. Many of them are ghost stories or tales of the supernatural. Adventures of Juan Oso, who was half bear and half man, are also given. Each chapter concludes with study questions, suggested activities and a vocabulary list. (DS)
Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, 7703 N. Lamar Blvd., Austin, Texas 78752 ($7.50)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Learner; Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Bilingual Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Pharr-San Juan-Alamo Independent School District, TX.; Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.
Identifiers: Curanderismo; Texas (South)
Note: Photographs may not reproduce clearly