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ERIC Number: ED172999
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Jan-31
Pages: 81
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Oregon Indian Textbook Review Project Submitted to the Oregon Commission on Indian Services (and the) Oregon Department of Education Textbook. Final Report.
Coburn, Joseph
Native Americans know that they have a complex social, political, and economic heritage, and they have been concerned that social studies textbooks describe the history, traditions, and values of Indian tribes much too simplistically and generally. To address the need for Indian heritage to be presented without bias, use of stereotypes, or perpetuation of myths, the Commission on Indian Services established a working committee representing Indian communities to conduct an intensive review of 29 grade 4-12 United States history textbooks scheduled for possible adoption by the state of Oregon in 1978. Community committees composed of Title IV staff and concerned parents reviewed 7 or 8 tests using uniform criteria established by the working committee and the State Textbook Commission. The criteria evaluated such aspects as: accuracy of data; Indian history as an integral part of American history; Indian culture as a dynamic process; national and worldwide contributions of Indians; the special social, economic, and political position of the Indian in American history; religious and philosophical contributions; illustrations; overall objectives of the text; presentation of content; style and tone; and learner appropriateness. Six texts were judged acceptable, 3 were acceptable if supplemented, 1 was found not applicable, and 19 were rejected as unacceptable. Specific strengths and/or weaknesses were cited for each text. (NEC)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Commission on Indian Services, Salem, OR.; Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.
Authoring Institution: Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.
Identifiers: Cultural Contributions; Oregon; Traditionalism
Note: Study prepared through the Pacific Northwest Indian Reading and Language Development Program