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ERIC Number: ED172716
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1976-Nov
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Some Effects of Educational Technology on Curriculum Reform: Examples From the University of New South Wales. TERC Research and Development Paper No. 43.
Magin, D. J.
The impact of educational technologies on various curricula and on projected curriculum reform at the University of New South Wales is discussed. It is argued that the existence and use of such technologies can reach beyond being tools that simply provide assistance in instruction, and can often have considerable effect on the curriculum itself. Most of the examples are drawn from engineering education and are concentrated in large part on the educational uses of interactive computing. The term 'educational technology' embraces commonplace instructional aids also. The use of a Wang desk-top minicomputer in an undergraduate engineering laboratory and resulting efforts to employ the minicomputer to improve the teaching effectiveness of laboratory experiments are described. The innovative use of automated marking (through optical scanning of appropriate answer sheets) and use of computer marking of quizzes incorporating a variant of the standard multiple-choice format are also discussed. Innovation in educational technology can also affect the content of a course. The introduction and increasing availability of on-line remote computing facilities, in which students participate in dynamic interaction with models of engineering systems, can open up new areas of syllabus and new sets of course objectives. (SW)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Tertiary Education Research Centre.
Identifiers: Australia; University of New South Wales (Australia)
Note: Not available in paper copy due to marginal legibility of original document; Paper based on a public lecture given to the Darling Downs Centre for Advanced Education in February 1975