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ERIC Number: ED172267
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Feb
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Impact of Mass Media in the Pacific Basin.
Casmir, Fred L.
In many developing nations, governments have invested in media technologies to propel their nations into the twentieth century. These measures have taken an increasing social, financial, and cultural toll. Questions surround the right of developed nations to impose their commercially oriented values on those who lack the means to achieve such standards of living, as well as the loss of traditional values and culture, the widely expressed faith that communication will produce change, and the Western concept of press freedom as absolute, based on Western social and theological ideas. Freedom and democracy in developing nations should be evaluated on the basis of the nation's own development rather than on Western expectations. Interfering with information dissemination in such nations are such factors as inadequate technology, the high cost of materials, and language differences. Outside media have added pressures to nascent systems by creating false hopes and incomplete impressions and by exploiting the inadequate evaluative background of developing nations' people to deal with various ideas, interfering with the gradual, self-defined development of a nation. Debate also centers on whether commercial or political interests should dictate what should be presented on television in these areas. (DF)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Pacific Region
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Speech Communication Association (Los Angeles, California, February 18-21, 1979)