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ERIC Number: ED171467
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1976
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
British Environmental Education: A Perspective. Taft Campus Occasional Paper No. 21.
Copeland, Arthur R.; Hammerman, Donald R., Ed.
British environmental education differs somewhat from that of the United States. In the U.S. "environmental education" refers to the teaching of a set of concepts by which one might learn to appreciate, conserve and protect the natural environment. In Great Britain many of the same objectives and procedures of the U.S. system are employed, but they are accomplished through more varied means. Conservation is still of importance, but the impact is stressed through more direct involvement of the individual through both formal activities and recreational experiences where pleasure and appreciation are part of the expected results. Environmental education in Great Britain was influenced by two issues: (1) the work of environmentalists in their efforts to clean up the material and aesthetical spoilage left by the industrial revolution and (2) the emergence of the environment as a teaching tool that could take children out of the classroom into the reality of a first-hand experience. Environmental education in England takes many forms from natural studies in the class to week-long trips to Field Study Centers where skills such as camping or sailing are taught. The final section of this paper describes three examples of environmental activities in which the author participated. These included a town survey, compass activities, and a trip to a county environmental center where children may visit from one day to a week to learn specific activities and apply lessons learned in class. (DS)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Northern Illinois Univ., Oregon. Larado Taft Field Campus. Dept. of Outdoor Teacher Education.
Identifiers: England; United States
Note: This paper adapted from an independent study written by Arthur R. Copeland while enrolled in Adventure, Environmental and Outdoor Education in England, Summer Session, 1976