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ERIC Number: ED171087
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979-Apr
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Preschool Mainstreaming: Current State of the Art.
Blacher-Dixon, Jan
Teachers in 22 First Chance Projects and 110 Head Start Projects responded to a survey focusing on defining preschool mainstreaming, characteristics and social interaction of handicapped and nonhandicapped children, teacher attitudes toward mainstreaming, teacher preparation for mainstreaming, and parent involvement. Results showed that there are basically two types of mainstreaming, the traditional (integration of handicapped children into preschool classrooms originally for nonhandicapped children, as in Head Start and the reverse, as in First Chance. Findings further indicated that there is a high degree of clarity about what constitutes mainstreaming at the preschool level. With regard to social interaction, both groups (handicapped and nonhandicapped) had friends in both groups, and nonhandicapped children rarely ignored their handicapped peers. All respondents strongly agreed that parental involvement is a key to successful mainstreaming and found that they had enough time to meet the needs of the parents. (Author/PHR)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Bureau of Education for the Handicapped (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill. Frank Porter Graham Center.
Identifiers: Project First Chance; Project Head Start
Note: Paper presented at the Annual International Convention, The Council for Exceptional Children (57th, Dallas, Texas, April 22-27, 1979, Session W-47); This research is part of the Carolina Institute for Research on Early Education of the Handicapped