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ERIC Number: ED170659
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978-Aug-29
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Classroom "Think Aloud" Program.
Camp, Bonnie W.; Bash, Mary A.
This program adapts the Think Aloud method, originally designed to assist young aggressive boys in achieving greater self-control, to improve problem-solving skills among first and second graders. Modeling of self-instructional verbalizations is used to teach children a systematic approach to analyzing a problem, planning an attack and evaluating outcomes. The classroom version concentrates on cognitive and academic problem situations. Fourteen randomly-assigned first- and second-grade classrooms received the Think Aloud program in one of three waves. All were pretested on the Raven Progressive Matrices, and children from each class were randomly assigned for retesting at the end of each wave. Fourteen regular classroom teachers learned to use the "Think Aloud" techniques for their entire classrooms. The process of modeling self-verbalizations was explained, demonstrated, and role-played in a preliminary session without pupils present. Teachers then observed a staff assistant introduce the program to the class. For one month, the regular teacher and staff assistant observed or taught Think Aloud to the class on alternate days. After teachers became comfortable with the program, they were encouraged to transfer the techniques from project materials to regular academic material. The presentation includes the program description and a brief video-tape of the program in action, a discussion of teaching it to regular classroom teachers, and results of cognitive test performance. (Author/LS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - General
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.
Authoring Institution: Colorado Univ., Denver. Medical Center.
Identifiers: Think Aloud
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, August, 1978); Figure 1 reproduced with permission from Plenum Press